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THE ENEMY-MCQs

Q.1. Where did Dr. Sadao first meet Hana?

a) at the Japanese university

b) at his neighbour’s home

c) at the American university

Answer: d) at the home of his American professor

d) at the home of his American professor

Q.2. The characteristic of Dr. Sadao’s father which is incorrect is?

a) he did not play with him

b) he sent his son to America because he liked the country

c) he did not joke with him

d) he had infinite plans for him

Answer: b) he sent his son to America because he liked the country

Q.3. Dr. Sadao knew that he would not be sent with the troops because

a) he was a famous surgeon

b) the General might need an operation

c) the Japanese government wanted him to pursue his discovery of “wound cleaning”

d) the General knew his late father

Answer: b) the General might need an operation

Q.4. On examination of the unconscious white man lying on the beach, Dr. Sadao found out….

a) he had been shot on the left side of his upper back

b) he had been shot on the right side of his upper back

c) he had been shot on the right side of his lower back

d) he had been shot on the left side of his lower back

Answer: c) he had been shot on the right side of his lower back

Q.5. After the General recovered from his operation, he confirmed to Dr. Sadao that he did not send the

assassins because

a) of lack of patriotism

b) of lack of dereliction of duty

c) he forgot his promise to Dr. Sadao

d) the assassins were unavailable at that time

Answer: c) he forgot his promise to Dr. Sadao

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Q.6. In the first meeting of Dr. Sadao with the General, the option which the General chose regarding the

white man was?

a) send soldiers to dump the white man in the sea

b) send soldiers to kill the white man

c) send assassins to kill and dispose of the body of the white man

d) send Police to arrest the white man

Answer: c) send assassins to kill and dispose of the body of the white man

Q.7. The burden of waiting for assassins by Dr. Sadao ended after?

a) the first night

b) the fourth night

c) the second night

d)the third night

Answer: d) after the third night

Q.8. Fathom is a unit for measurement of?

a) area

b) volume

c) depth

d) weight

Answer: c) depth

Q.9. What did Dr. Sadao not provide the white man with at the time of his departure?

a) boat

b) gun

c) food and bottled water

d) flashlight

Answer: b) gun

Q.10. Dr. Sadao’s most important instruction to the white man while planning his departure was?

a) eat raw fish

b) until you saw a Korean fishing boat

c) use flashlight at the instant the sun drops over the horizon

d) a fire would be seen

Answer: b) until you saw a Korean fishing boat

Q.11. For the old gardener, the best of fertilizers is?

a) eggshells

b) coffee grounds

c) banana peels

d) blood

Answer: d) blood

Q.12. The messenger came to the door in official uniform and Hana thought?

a) he has come to arrest Dr. Sadao and herself

b) he has come to arrest the white man

c) he has come to arrest Dr. Sadao

d) he has come with an important message.

Answer: c) he has come to arrest Dr. Sadao

Q.13. How shall I do the anesthetic, Hana asked? Dr. Sadao replied-

a) simply saturate the cotton and hold it near his nose

b) simply fill the syringe from the bottle and administer an injection on the leg

c) simply pour the contents of the bottle on the wound

d) simply fill the syringe from the bottle and administer injection on the arm

Answer: a) simply saturate the cotton and hold it near his nose

Q.14. While performing the operation, Dr. Sadao had the habit of?

a) speaking with the patient

b) saying a prayer

c) listening to music

d) looking up to the ceiling

Answer: a) speaking with the patient

Q.15. Hana crouched close to the sleeping face of the young American and thought?

a) she should not assist Dr. Sadao in the operation

b) the police might catch them performing the operation

c) it was a piteously thin face, and the lips were twisted

d) some family friends may unexpectedly visit them

Answer: c) it was a piteously thin face and the lips were twisted

Q.16. The concluding argument by Yumi for not washing the white man was?

a) I have never washed a white man

b) I am a poor person and it is not my business

c) I will not wash so dirty a one now

d) I have never washed any man

Answer: b) I am a poor person and it is not my business

Q.17. He spelled it out: “U.S. Navy.” The man was a prisoner of war! The thought which did not occur to

Dr. Sadao and Hana was?

a) he has escaped and that is why he is wounded

b) can we put him back in the sea

c) all Americans are my enemy

d) that Dr. Sadao will have to perform the operation to save his life

Answer: d) that Dr. Sadao will have to perform an operation to save his life

Q.18. “I feel I ought to thank you, Doctor, for having saved my life.” Dr. Sadao responded as?

a) I was just following the profession as a doctor

b) I ought, of course, to give you to the police

c) Don’t thank me too early

d) I do not know myself what I shall do with you

Answer: c) Don’t thank me too early

Q.19. An escaped prisoner of war washed up on the shore in front of Dr. Sadao’s house on

a) the twenty-fifth day of February

b) on the twenty-first day of February

c) on the twenty-ninth day of February

d) on the twenty-seventh day of February

Answer: b) on the twenty-first day of February

Q.20. Tokonoma refers to:

a) the floor of a Japanese room

b) a cupboard in a Japanese room

c) a decoration space in a Japanese room

d) a window in a Japanese room

Answer: c) a decoration space in a Japanese room

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THE ENEMY

TEXTUAL QUESTIONS SOLVED

Ques: Will Dr.Sadao be arrested on the charge of harbouring an enemy?

Answer: For humanitarian interests as well as finding it his ethical obligation, Dr Sadao tended a wounded prisoner of war that was technically a serious crime. He was never revealed to anyone but his wife, faithful yet cautious staff, and a general who was so self-obsessed with his own treatment that he would never let the doctor leave him.

Ques: Will Hana help the wounded man and wash him herself?

Answer: The injured American was in very poor shape and had to be cleaned before being operated on. Hana did not want Dr.Sadao to clean up the filthy and unconscious prisoner, so Yumi asked her servant to do so. Yumi, however, followed the order of her master and opted out of the order. As a consequence, Hana had no choice but to wash him herself. While this act was impulsive and dipped over her servant, Yumi, in a sense of dominance, she did so with honesty.

Ques: What will Dr.Sadao and his wife do with the man?

Answer: Dr.Sadao and Hana found an unconscious, wounded prisoner of war who posed a great threat to their own survival. Dr Sadao, however, agreed to go with his intestinal feeling and operate on him. He has saved his life even though it has been for now. While half heartily both took good care of the health and other needs of the patient. Only Hana cleaned, fed him with her own hand. Though they knew that sooner or later they would have to hand him over to the army, they did their best to help the injured person.

Ques: Will Dr Sadao be arrested on the charge of harbouring an enemy?

Answer: For both humanitarian and medical purposes, Dr Sadao treated a wounded prisoner of war who was technically a serious criminal. He was never revealed to anyone but his wife, faithful yet timid staff, and a general who was so self-obsessed with his own treatment that he would never let the doctor leave him.

Ques: What will Dr Sadao do to get rid of the man?

Answer: With the wounded American’s health improving slowly, Dr.Sadao and Hana were in a bind as to what could be done with him. Their loyal servants had left them and could pose a threat to their lives if they kept him in their home. As the impatience and frustration of Hana rose, Dr.Sadao revealed the matter to the General who decided to send assassins in his sleep to kill the young American. Dr Sadao decided on getting rid of the escaped prisoner of war. The matter could not be resolved, however, because the assassins had never arrived.

SoDr.Sadao plotted another way to get rid of him, overcome with remorse, and a distant appreciation to the people he had been associated with America. Another time, he decided to save his patient. He secretly sent him to an isolated island with food, bottled water, clothing, blanket and his own flashlight on a boat from where he sailed for freedom and protection on a Korean ship.

Ques: There are moments in life when we have to make hard choices between our roles as private individuals and as citizens with a sense of national loyalty. Discuss with reference to the story you have just read.

Answer: There are many dimensions of life. We live it by maintaining a delicate balance between the different facets it offers to us as part of our individual existence in society. There are just a few of them living for our own self, family, profession, and country. At times, however, keeping this balance is complicated, and is overshadowed by uncertainty and dilemmas.

This is exemplified in the story about Dr.Sadao, Hana and the prisoner of war. Dr.Sadao and Hana can’t decide what to do when they discover a wounded war prisoner washed ashore. They are confused as to whether they should save and tend the injured, or whether they should let him die or inform the army.

Dr.Sadao finally strikes a balance by attempting to rescue him before handing him over to the military. He and his wife sympathetically tend to him but subjugate their forgiving selves by the burden of illegally keeping a prisoner of war in their home and going against the rule of law. In a bid to get rid of this burden, Dr.Sadao reveals it to the General who promises by assassins to get the prisoner killed. Yet the human side of Dr Sadao shows up again asking him to ply with his soul’s voice, and he goes out of his way to help the enemy soldier escape to safety.

Ques: Dr.Sadaowas compelled by duty as a doctor to help the enemy soldier. What made Hana, his wife, sympathetic to him in the face of open defiance from the domestic staff?

Answer: Dr.Sadao and Hana knew that each would question their decision to save the enemy soldier. They followed their sense of duty firmly however. This sense of duty came from the profession he was in for Dr.Sadao, but for Hana, the duty was strictly humanitarian. She does it with grace and integrity, from handling the turmoil in her domestic workers to being compelled to do all of the house-hold chores herself. The caring, considerate, and compassionate essence of Hana shines out. Although it wasn’t her job she washed and fed the soldier. Her care has helped the soldier quickly recover.

It explains why she returns to the room even after feeling ill and is ready to do whatever her husband asks her during the procedure.

Ques: How would you explain the reluctance of the soldier to leave the shelter of the doctor’s home even when he knew he couldn’t stay there without risk to the doctor and himself?

Answer: When the American prisoner of war came to consciousness and realized he ‘d been saved by a Japanese family, he feared he ‘d be handed over to the army soon. But when he remembered how much love and care the family had given him, he realized he was in safe hands. He knew that while he was a threat to the family of the doctor there could be saved his own life. Ultimately, burdened with gratitude to the family, he agrees to comply with what the doctor has decided for him-the escape.

Ques: What explains the attitude of the General in the matter of the enemy soldier? Was it human consideration, lack of national loyalty, dereliction of duty or simply self absorption?

Answer: The General was totally self-absorbed. He was a Dr.Sadao patient and when it came to his health, he did not trust anybody but him. He could not take the risk of living unprotected if the doctor was executed for treachery. He had personal killers that he vowed to use to destroy the wounded soldier. But he sadly ‘forgot’ his pledge to assist the doctor. Humans were not his cup of tea.

Ques: While hatred against a member of the enemy race is justifiable, especially during war time, what makes a human being rise above narrow prejudices?

Answer: War news is fast to become a way of life. The moment you pick up a newspaper, one is bombarded, directly or indirectly, with news of wars between various countries. The countries at war are obviously enemies and hatred is part of that enmity. And humanity’s achievement comes when we rise above this enmity and show our respect for the entire world. Dr Sadao has done the same. He did whatever he could to save a man’s life which he knew was a prisoner of war. He was overwhelmed with worry the moment he saw the wounded man. Ignoring the fact that he was his country’s enemy and must have killed too many Japanese, and may have killed many more, he spared him if he was alive.

Ques: Do you think the doctor’s final solution to the problem was the best possible one in the circumstances?

Answer: As part of his duties the doctor did his utmost to save the wounded soldier. The final question, however, was what to do next. It can not be said that while he told the General the truth, he betrayed his country. However, he decided to help him escape when he discovered that the soldier was to be killed not for the good of the country but only to save the doctor’s life. For such a case, the final solution to the dilemma for the doctor was the only one possible.

Deys-The-Enemy-PPTs-Divine-Book-English-Core-XII

The Enemy
By Pearl S. Buck

Before you Read

It is the time of the World War. An American prisoner of war is washed ashore in a dying state and is found at the doorstep of a Japanese doctor. Should he save him as a doctor or hand him over to the Army as a patriot

About the writer

The Nobel Prize is a set of annual international awards bestowed in several categories by Swedish and Norwegian institutions in recognition of academic, cultural, or scientific advances. The Swedish chemist, engineer and industrialist Alfred Nobel established the five Nobel prizes in ChemistryLiteraturePeacePhysics, and Physiology or Medicine
  The Pulitzer Prize is an award for achievements in newspaper, magazine and online journalism, literature, and musical composition in the United States.
https://www.successcds.net/images/vistas1.jpg

Pearl Sydenstricker Buck (1892 – 1973)

Pearl Sydenstricker Buck (1892 – 1973) was an American writer and novelist. She had a Chinese name – Sai Zhenzhu as she spent her childhood in China, being the daughter of missionaries. She was awarded the Pulitzer prize in 1932 and the Nobel Prize in Literature in the year 1938.

CHARACTERS

Dr.SadaoHoki (Japanese Surgeon and Scientist)

Hana (Sadao’s Wife)

Tom (American POW)

General (Japanese)

CHOOSE THE CORRECT OPTION

Q1- Who is the author of the lesson The Enemy?

A) Pearl S. Buck
B) Dickens
C) D.H.Lawrence
D) None

Q2- Why did Dr Sadao treat the soldier when he was from enemy’s nationality?

A) He was a doctor
B) It was against his professional ethics
C) as a doctor he could not let anyone die
D) All

Q3- Who was Dr.Sadao?

A) An Iranian Doctor
B) An American doctor
C) A Japanese doctor
D) None 

Q4- How did Hana help Dr.Sadao?

A) By assisting him
B) by giving him money
C) by giving him tools
D) by working as a nurse

Q5- Why did the General not pass orders to arrest Dr.Sadao for giving space to a white man?

A) because he trusted him
B) because he needed him
C) General was not in good health and needed his services
D) None

Q6- Why did Dr become irritable and impatient with his patients?

A) because of his inability to leave the white man to help his distressed wife
B) because of many patients
C) because of General’s pressure
D) All these

Q7- Why did Dr.’s wife feel distressed?

A) seeing many patients
B) Seeing General’s reaction
C) Seeing the orders
D) Seeing Whiteman’s blood

Q8- Why did the surgeon speak sharply to his wife?

A) to get things he needed
B) to get her help
C) to stop any disturbance that could lead to harm the wounded man.
D) None

Q9- What was Hana’s reaction over her husband’s words?

A) She held her mouth with her hands and vomited outside the operation room
B) she shouted
C) she cried
D) she stopped helping him

Q10- Why did Hana wash the wounded man herself?

A) Because of her servants
B) because her servants ran away
C) because her servants refused to help an American enemy soldier
D) none

Q11- Why did the servants refuse to help ?

A) out of fears
B) because of superstitions
C) because he was an American Soldier
D) All these

Q12- How did Dr. ensure that the American Soldier had left safely?

A) by escorting him
B) by seeing no signal of flashlight
C) by giving him a call
D) none

Q13- Why did Sadao marry a Japanese girl only?

A) because he liked Japanese
B) he didn’t like any other nationality
C) Because of his father’s fear
D) because he didn’t want to upset his father

Q14- What kind of person was Sadao’sfather ?

A) a serious
B) a jolly good man
C) very strict
D) A true patriot and traditional person

Q15- Why did the messenger come to the doctor?

A) to meet him
B) for check-up
C) to inform about the General’s pain
D) All these

Q16- Seeing the messenger, what was Hana’s reaction?

A) She got frightened
B) she thought he has come to arrest her husband
C) General’s man
D) All these

Q17- What kind of person The General was?

A) a kind hearted
B) a wise man
C) a selfish man
D) none

Q18- Why did General spare the White American soldier?

A) to spare his own life
B) he himself was in pain
C) needed Dr Sadao’s help
D) All these

Q19- How did Dr get rid of the American Soldier?

A) by giving him instructions
B) by giving him flashlight to use in times of distress
C) by asking him to row to the island
D) All these

Q20- Why was Dr.Sadao not sent to the battlefield?

A) because he had no interest
B) he didn’t love his country
C) he was supposed to offer his services to the General who was in pain
D) All these

Q21- Why did Dr. Give his flashlight to the enemy soldier?

A) to help him
B) to show him the way in the dark
C) so that he could send him signal in case of any distress
D) All these

Q22- What was General’s plan for American soldier?

A) he wanted him to reach safely
B) will inform his country
C) will get him assassinated by some private assassins
D) none

Q23- Why did the servants leave Dr.’sHouse?

A) Because he was wounded
B) because he was dirty
C) Because he was an American Soldier and they didn’t like him
D) All

Q24- Where did Dr find American soldier?

A) in the park
B) in the battlefield
C) outside his house
D) none

Q25- Why did Dr.help an enemy soldier?

A) because he was an ethical and sincere doctor
B) because he was his friend
C) because he knew him
D) none

Q26- What conflicting ideas disturb Dr.’s mind after he brought American soldier?

A) duty of a doctor and loyalty towards nation
B) his wife’s health and general’s health
C) patient’s health and servants
D) servants’ behaviour

Q27- How did Dr emerge successfully out of all the conflicts?

A) by throwing the patients out of his house
B) by sending his servants out of the house
C) by succumbing before the general
D) By saving soldier’s life as a sincere doctor and helping him to escape

Q28- What kind of person Dr Sadao was?

A) an excellent doctor
B) a compassionate human being
C) Sincere and responsible citizen
D) All these

Q29- What idea do you form of Dr after reading the lesson?

A) an excellent doctor
B) a compassionate human being
C) Sincere and responsible citizen
D) All these

Q30- What were the dominant traits of Dr.’s personality?

A) expertise in his profession and compassion as a human
B) obstinate
C) doesn’t like to obey anyone
D) rude

Q31- Why did Dr.Sadao go to America?

A) to meet the soldiers
B) to meet his friends
C) to travel
D) to study surgery and medicine which was his father’s wish

Q32- What did Dr give to the soldier?

A) his boat
B) food to eat
C) flashlight to use in distress
D) All these

Q33- What does this chapter revolve around?

A) war
B) war between Israel and America
C) war between Malesia and America
D) war between Japan and America

Q34- What does the narrator speak about in the beginning of the chapter?

A) the war
B) the General
C) Dr.Sadao’s childhood and his father.
D) the servants and Dr ‘s wife

Q35- Where did Dr.meet Hana?

A) in Japan
B) in his neighbour
C) in the battlefield
D) at professor Harley’s house in America

QUESTIONS FOR SELF-ASSESSMENT:-

  1. WHAT WAS Sadao’s father’s dream for him? How did Sadao realise it?
  2. Why was Dr.Sadao not sent to the battlefield?
  3. How did the writer indicate that Sadao’s father was a very traditional and conventional man?
  4. What role did the American professor play in bringing Hana and Sadao together?
  5. Why did Sadao treat the POW even though it was an unpatriotic act on his part?
  6. Why did Sadao seek Hana’s help to treat POW?
  7. O n the 7th day after American soldier was found by Sadao, two things happened. Why did Hana feel scared of the second?
  8. Why did messenger come to Sadao? What did he think about it?
  9. Why did the General not order immediate arrest of Sadao, who had sheltered a white man?
  10. How did Sadao ensure that the American soldier left his house but he himself remained safe and secure?
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2. THE ENEMY

-Pearl S Buck

GIST OF THE LESSON:

· Dr. Sadao, a Japanese surgeon finds a wounded American soldier on the beach near his

house.

· He is unable to throw him back though he was his enemy as he was a doctor and his first

duty was to save a life.

· Hana, his wife, though initially reluctant because it was dangerous for all including the

children to keep the enemy in the house, joins her husband in operating and nursing the

enemy soldier back to health, even though the servants desert the house.

· Hana assists Dr. Sadao in operating the soldier in spite of her physical discomfort and hesitation.

· Though it was war time and all hands were needed at the front, the General did not send

Sadao with the troops as he is an expert surgeon and the General needed him.

· Sadao tells him about the enemy soldier but he does not take any action as he is selfabsorbed and forgets his promise that he would send his private assassins to kill the enemy and remove his body.

· Taking advantage of the general’s self-absorption Sadao decides to save the soldiers life.

After the soldier is out of danger Dr. Sadao helps him to escape from his house to safety.

Character Sketch of Sadao

– Dedicated surgeon and doctor, is compassionate and kind for people

in distress

– Conflict between duty as a doctor and duty as a Japanese

– Prejudiced against the white man, afraid of being called a traitor

– Shelters the enemy and saves his life.

– Out of loyalty to his country, informs the General

– helps the white man escape

Character Sketch of Hana

– Balanced woman, stands with her husband

– Responsible – washes prisoner, treats him respectfully

– Dignified and graceful about servants leaving the house

– helped Sadao in the operation

– administers anesthesia to the prisoner

American Soldier – Tom

– Hardly 17, taken prisoner

– Escaped, but shot at the back

– suffered torture and hunger

– Wounded, bleeding, was in great pain, lay unconscious

– Strong will-power

– Full of gratitude towards Dr. Sadao

The General

– Selfish, thinks of his treatment only

– had faith in Sadao’s skill as a doctor

– Promises to send private assassins to get rid of the prisoner

Careless – forgot to send assassins

Reaction of Servants

– Don’t agree with the idea of helping an enemy

– Yumi refused to wash the white man

– Gardener felt Sadao should have let the soldier die

– Thought sea and gods would take revenge if Sadao saved the soldier

– felt Sadao was proud of his skill and used it irresponsibly

– left the house till the time the prisoner stayed there.

How Sadao helped the soldier escape

– Put food and extra clothing in the boat.

– Directed him to row to an uninhabited island .

– Asked him to wait for a Korean fishing boat

– Told him to catch fish but eat it raw

– Gave him his flash light

– Told him to flash the torch twice if food ran out and one flash if he

was alright

– Gave him Japanese clothes and covered his hair with a black cloth.

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SOLVED SHORT ANSWER QUESTIONS:

1. Why did the General overlook the matter of the enemy soldier?

The General had an attack and according to Dr. Sadao he could not survive the second attack. So if Dr. Sadao was arrested, no other doctor was capable of performing the operation. So for furthering his selfish needs he overlooked the matter and promises to send his assassins. But he was so self-absorbed, he forgot about it.

2. Why was Dr. Sadao not sent with the troops?

The General thought that Dr. Sadao is indispensable to his life and can save anyone as he is

very skilled. He also does not trust anyone except Dr. Sadao. So he was not sent with troops.

3. How was the plan of the prisoner’s escape executed in the story?

The prisoner was successful in his escape only because of the right guidance and help from Dr. Sadao. He provided him his boat, gave his food, made him wear Japanese cloths and also

helped him in comfortable sail to a nearby island.

4. Why did the servants leave Dr. Sadao’s house?

They were not in favour of keeping the American prisoner hidden in the house. They also didnot want Dr. Sadao to save his life as he was the enemy. Also, if the police come to know of it,all their lives would be in danger. So they left the house.

5. Who was the white man whom Dr. Sadao and Hana found?

The white man was an American soldier as evident from his clothes. They guess that he was

a prisoner of war from his cap that said ‘Navy Seals’

6. ‘‘But Sadao searching the spot of black in the twilight sea that night, had

his reward’’. What was the reward?

The “reward” was the escape of the enemy. Dr. Sadao searched the spot of black in the twilight sea that night to see if the man was still there but there was no light. Obviously the man had gone. The escape of the prisoner was his reward.

7. What message does “The Enemy” give?

This is a great lesson in humanism. Dr. Sadao by nursing his country’s enemy proves true to his professional ethics.

LONG ANSWER QUESTIONS

1. How did Dr. Sadao rise above narrow prejudices of race & country to human being in need?

Value Points

Dr. Sadao- a renowned Japanese surgeon- believed in professional loyalty & human kindness saw an American wounded soldier in a terrible condition on beach in front of his house-took him his house with the help of his wife Hana-successfully removed the bullet-nursed him back to his life-thus rose above racialism.

As a patriot, reported the prisoner’s presence at his house to the Army General. The general

decided to have him killed-he grew vestless to see him & finally decided to help him to escape form his house-gave him boats & instructed him how he could safely escape.

2. Do you think the doctor’s final solution to the problem was the best possible one in the

circumstances?

Value Points

It is the best possible option-general had promised him that he would get the soldier quietly

killed through his private assassins-but he forgot to get rid of- Dr. Sadao could do nothing-he

wanted to get rid of the wounded soldier-as the servants had left the house-and news could be spread-so he devised his own plan to get the soldier off to the nearby island-managed his boat for the soldier and instructed him. The white soldier took leave of him and followed his

instruction and managed to escape safely. Thus all this proves that that was the only way out for Dr. Sadao to the problem.

3. There are moments in life when we have to make hard choice between our role as private

individuals and as citizens with a sense of national loyalty. Discuss with reference to the Enemy.

Value Points

Dr. Sadao encounters with the dilemma-to live as private individual whose and moral ethical

responsibility is to save the soldier. So as a doctor and as an individual his first job is to save the man-takes ethical responsibility, he risks his life, fame and social status- takes him to his house and makes efforts to save him.

But his other side-sense of patriotism and nationalism also involves a report to police, takes the general in confidence, and plans to get the enemy soldier killed but later on helps the soldier in escaping. Thus Dr. Sadao’s personality is displayed as patriotic citizen.

Class: XII

Subject: English

Vistas: Chapter 4 – The Enemy

QUESTIONS FROM TEXTBOOK SOLVED

READ AND FIND OUT
Q1. Who was Dr Sadao? Where was his house?
Ans. Dr SadaoHoki was an eminent Japanese surgeon and scientist. He had spent eight valuable years of his youth in America to learn all that could be learnt of surgery and medicine there. He was perfecting a discovery which would render wounds entirely clean.
Dr Sadao’s house was built on rocks well above a narrow beach that was outlined with bent pines. It was on a spot of the Japanese coast.

Q2. Will Dr Sadao be arrested on the charge of harbouring an enemy?
Ans. Dr Sadao knew that they would be arrested if they sheltered a white man in their house. The wounded man was a prisoner of war who had escaped with a bullet on his back. Since Japan was at war with America, harbouring an enemy meant being a traitor to Japan. Dr Sadao could be arrested if anyone complained against him and accused him of harbouring an enemy.

Q3. Will Hana help the wounded man and wash him herself?
Ans. The gardener and the cook were frightened that their master was going to heal the wound of a white man—an enemy. They felt that after being cured he (the white man) will take revenge on the Japanese. Yumi, the maid, was also frightened. She refused to wash the white man. Hana rebuked the maid who had refused to wash a wounded helpless man. Then she dipped a small dean towel into the steaming hot water and washed the white man’s face. She kept on washing him until his upper body was quite dean. But she dared not turn him over.

Q4. What will Dr Sadao and his wife do with the man?
Ans. Dr Sadao and his wife, Hana, had told the servants that they only wanted to bring the man to his senses so that they could turn him over as a prisoner. They knew that the best possible course under the circumstances was to put him back into the sea. However, Dr Sadao was against handing over a wounded man to the police. He needed to carry him into his house. He operated upon him and extracted the bullet from his body. He kept the white man in his house. He and his wife looked after him and fed him till he was strong enough to walk on his legs.

Q5. Will Dr Sadao be arrested on the charge of harbouring an enemy?
Ans. It was the seventh day since Dr Sadao had operated upon the young white man. Early that morning, their three servants left together. In the afternoon, a messenger came there in official uniform. He told Dr Sadao that he had to come to the palace at once as the old General was in pain again.
Hana, who had thought that the officer had come to arrest Dr Sadao, asked the messenger, “Is that all?” The baffled messenger enquired if that was not enough. She tried to cover her mistake by expressing regret and admitted that the General’s illness was enough. Dr Sadao told the General about the white man he had operated upon. Since Dr Sadao was indispensable to the General, he promised that Dr Sadao would not be arrested.

6. What will Dr Sadao do to get rid of the man?
Ans.DrSadao had told the old General that he had operated upon a white man. The General promised to send his private assassins to kill the man silently and secretly at night and remove his body. Dr Sadao left the outer partition of white man’s room open. He waited anxiously for three nights. The servants had left their house. His wife Hana had to cook, clean the house and serve the wounded man. She was unaccustomed to this labour. She was anxious that they should get rid of the man.
Dr Sadao told Tom, the white man, that he was quite well then. He offered to put his boat on the shore that night. It would have food and extra clothing in it. Tom might be able to row to the little island which was not far from the coast. It had not been fortified. The .water was quite deep. Nobody lived there, as it was submerged in storm. Since it was not the season of storm, he could live there till he saw a Korean fishing boat pass by. He gave the man his flashlight. He was to signal twice with his flashlight at sunset in case his food ran out. In case, he was still there and all right, he was to signal only once.
Dr Sadao gave the man Japanese clothes and covered his blond head with a black doth. In short, Dr Sadao helped the man to escape from Japan. At the same time he also got rid of the man.

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MORE QUESTIONS SOLVED

SHORT ANSWER TYPE QUESTIONS
Q1.What do you learn about Sadao’s father from the story ‘The Enemy’?
Ans. Sadao’s father was a visionary. He knew that the islands near the sea coast were the stepping stones to the future for Japan. No one could limit their future as it depended on what they made it. His son’s education was his chief concern. He sent his son to America at the age of twenty-two to learn all that could be learned of surgery and medicine. He loved the Japanese race, customs and manners.

Q2. Why was Dr Sadao being kept in Japan and not sent abroad with the troops?
Ans. Sadao was an eminent surgeon and a scientist. He was perfecting a discovery which would render wounds entirely clean. Secondly, the old General was being treated medically for a condition for which he might need an operation. Due to these two reasons Sadao was being kept in Japan and not sent abroad with the troops.

Q3. Who was Sadao’s wife? Where had he met her? Why did he wait to fall in love with her?
Ans. Hana was Sadao’s wife. He had met her by chance at an American professor’s house. Professor Harley and his wife had been kind people. They held a party at their home for their few foreign students. Hana was a new student. He waited to fall in love with her until he was sure she was Japanese. It was because his father would never have received her unless she had been pure in her race.

Q4. When and where did Sadao marry Hana? How was their married life?
Ans. Sadao married Hana when they returned to Japan after finishing their work at medical school. Sadao’s father saw her. The marriage was then arranged in the old Japanese way. They had been married years enough to have two children. Their married life was quite happy. They still loved each other.

Q5. ‘Both of them saw something black came out of the mists’. What did they see and how did they react to it?
Ans. It was a man who had been flung up out of the ocean, to his feet by a breaker. He staggered a few steps with his arms above his head. Then the curled mists hid him again. When they next saw him, he was on his hands and knees crawling. Then they saw him fall on his face and lie there. Sadao thought that he was perhaps a fisherman who had been washed from his boat. He ran quickly down the steps. Hana followed him.

Q6. In which state did Sadao and Hana find the man? What did they learn about him?
Ans. The man lay motionless with his face in the sand. As they turned the man’s head, they saw that he was a white man with long yellow hair. His young face had a rough yellow beard. He was unconscious. From his battered cap they learnt that he was a sailor from an American warship.

Q7. What did Sadao learn about the white man’s wound?
Ans. Sadao saw that a gun-wound had been reopened on the right side of his lower back. The flesh was blackened with powder. The man had been shot recently and had not been tended. It was bad chance that the rock had struck the wound and reopened it.

Q8. How can you say that Sadao’s head and hands worked in different directions?
Ans. Sadao’s head told him to put the man back into the sea as he was an American soldier-an enemy of Japan. His trained hands seemed, of their own will, to be doing what they could to stanch the fearful bleeding. He packed the wound with the sea-moss that strewed the beach. The bleeding was stopped for the moment.

Q9.What dilemma did Sadao face about the young white man?
Ans. The white man was wounded. He needed immediate medical care. Dr Sadao could do so. But if they sheltered a white man in their house, they would be arrested. On the other hand, if they turned him over as a prisoner, he would certainly die. Dr Sadao was in a fix. It was difficult for him to come to any decision.

Q10.What was the attitude of Sadao and Hana towards the white man?
Ans. They stared upon the inert figure of the white man with a curious repulsion. Both talked of putting him back into the sea, but neither of them was able to do so alone. They hesitated. Sadao said that being American, the man was his enemy. He would have handed him over to the police if he had not been wounded. But since he was wounded… He left the sentence incomplete, implying that he couldn’t do so.

Q11.What solution did Hana offer to resolve Sadao’s predicament?
Ans. Hana found that neither of them could throw the white man back into the sea. There was only one thing to do. They must carry the man into their house. They must tell the servants that they intended to hand him over to the police. She reminded her husband of his position and children. It would endanger all of them if they did not give that man over as a prisoner of war.

Q12. How did Sadao and Hana take the man inside their house?
Ans. Together they lifted the man. He was very light. His arms were hanging down. They carried him up the steps and into the side door of the house. This door opened into a passage. Down the passage, they carried him towards an empty bedroom. They laid the man on the deeply matted floor.

Q13. Hana took out a soft quilt from the wall cupboard. Then she hesitated. Why? What did her husband suggest? Why did she not agree?
Ans. The quilt was covered with flowered silk and the lining was pure white silk. Secondly, the man was quite dirty. So Hana hesitated. Her husband suggested that he should be washed. He offered to wash him, if she was willing to fetch water. She could not bear for him to touch the man and offered to tell Yumi, the maid, to wash him.

Q14. Why did Dr Sadaohad to touch the man? What did he observe?
Ans. The utter pallor of the man’s unconscious face moved Dr Sadao first to stoop and feel his pulse. It was faint but it was there. Then he put his hand against the man’s cold breast. The heart too was yet alive. He observed that the man would die unless he was operated on.

Q15. Why did Hana come behind Sadao when he went out of the room quickly?
Ans. Hana did not wish to be left alone with the white man. He was the first she had seen since she left America. He seemed to have nothing to do with those whom she had known there. Here he was her enemy, a menace, living or dead.

Q16. How did the servants react when their master told them about the wounded white man?
Ans. The servants were frightened and puzzled. The old gardener told Hana that the master ought not to heal the wound of that white man. He said that the white man ought to die. First he was shot. Then the sea caught him and wounded him with her rocks. If the master healed what the gun and the sea had done, they would take revenge on them.

Q17. Why had Hana to wash the wounded man herself?
Ans. Hana told Yumi to fetch hot water and bring it to the room where the white man was. Yumi put down the wooden bucket, but refused to wash the dirty white man. Hana cried at her severely. She told her to do what her master commanded her to do. The fierce look of resistance upon Yumfe dull face made Hana afraid. Under these circumstances, Hana had no option but to wash the white man herself.

Q18. How did Hana wash the wounded man?
Ans. First, Hana untied the knotted rugs that kept the white man covered. When she had his breast bare, she dipped a small clean towel into the steaming hot water and washed his face carefully. She kept on washing him until his upper body was quite clean. But she dared not turn him over for fear of the wound.

Q19. What help did Dr Sadao seek from Hana while operating the wounded white man?

Ans. First, he asked her to fetch towels. Then he told her that she would have to give him the anaesthetic if he needed it. Since, Hana had never done so, he told her that it was easy enough. He asked her to soak the cotton with anaesthetic and hold it near his nostrils. When he breathed badly, she had to move it away a little. Thus, Hana proved herself helpful to her husband.

Q20. How did Hana react to Sadao’s absorption in his work?
Ans. Sadao went on with his swift concise movements. He did not seem to hear her. She was used to his absorption when he was at work. She wondered for a moment if it mattered to him what the body was upon which he worked so long as it was for the work which he did so excellently.

Q21. What did Sadao remark when he peered into the wound with his bright surgeon’s light?
Ans. He remarked that the bullet was still there. He said so with cool interest. He then wondered
how deep that wound was. If it was not very deep it was possible that he could get the bullet. He observed that the bleeding was not superficial. The man had already lost much blood.

Q22. What made a cool surgeon (like Dr Sadao) speak sharply to his wife? How did she react to his command?
Ans. The sight of blood made Hana choke. Her face turned pale. She had never seen an operation. Dr Sadao spoke sharply and asked her not to faint. He did not put down his exploring instrument. He argued that if he stopped then the man would surely die. Hana clapped her hands to her mouth, leaped up and ran out of the room. He heard her retching in the garden. But he went on with his work.

Q23. What forced Dr Sadao to be impatient and irritable with his patient?
Ans. Sadao heard Hana retching in the garden and said that it would be better for her to empty her stomach. He went on with his work. He had forgotten that she had never seen an operation. But her distress and his inability to go to her at once made him impatient and irritable with the man who lay like dead under his knife.

Q24. What instructions did Sadao give to Hana to administer the anaesthetic and when?
Ans. The man was beginning to stir. Hana asked Sadao where the anaesthetic was. Sadao motioned with his chin. She now had the bottle and some cotton in her hand. Sadao instructed her to saturate the cotton with anaesthetic and hold it near the man’s nostrils. She had to move it away a little when he breathed badly.

Q25. How did Hana react to the stories they heard of the sufferings of the prisoners of war? What made her think so?
Ans. These stories came like flickers of rumour, told by word of mouth. They were always contradicted. Hana wondered whether these stories were true. In the newspapers the reports were that people received the Japanese armies gladly with cries of joy at their liberation.

Q26. In what context does Hana remember General Takima? What does she infer?
Ans. General Takima was a ruthless despot. At home he beat his wife cruelly. No one mentioned it now because he had won a victory in a battle in Manchuria. Hana remembers him in the context of the sufferings of the prisoners of war. She infers that if a man (like General Takima) could be so cruel to a woman in his power, he would be quite cruel to a prisoner. The deep red scars on the white man’s neck confirmed her apprehension.

Q27. “Ml thought left him. He felt only the purest pleasure.” Why, do you think, did Dr Sadao behave in this way?
Ans. Dr Sadao was concentrating hard on locating the bullet. He felt the tip of his probing instrument strike against something hard, dangerously near the kidney. He was filled with the purest pleasure at the success of his skill. He thought only of curing his patient and did not answer even his wife’s query.

Q28. Dr Sadao was ‘familiar with every atom of this human body’. Who had seen to that knowl¬edge and how?
Ans. It was Sadao’s old American professor of Anatomy who had seen to the perfect knowledge of human body. He would tell his students, ‘Ignorance of the human body is the surgeon’s cardinal sin.” He would go a step further and impress upon the budding surgeons to have as complete knowledge of the body as if they had made it. To operate with anything less than that meant a murder.

Q29. Comment on Dr Sadao’s attitude to the white man in the light of the following:
(i) “Sadao took up his wrist, hating the touch of it.”
(ii) “But certainly I do not want this man to live.”
(iii) “This man will live in spite of all.”
Ans. Sadao has an ambivalent attitude towards the wounded white man. Since he is their enemy, he hates touching his wrist. As a patriot he does not want that man to live. However, as a surgeon, he does not want the man to die after a successful operation. Hence, in order to revive his faint, feeble pulse, he gives him an injection. The pulse now flutters and then grows stronger. The survival of the man is the victory of the surgeon’s skill.

Q30. How did Harm look after the white man? How did he react?
Ans. Hana had to serve him herself, for none of the servants would enter the room. She did not like him and yet she was moved to comfort him. She found the man quite weak and terrified. She knelt and fed him gently from the porcelain spoon. He ate unwillingly but still he ate.

Q31. How did Dr Sadao respond to the boy’s query: “What are you going to do with me?…Are you going to hand me over?”
Ans. Dr Sadao examined the boy and then told him that he did not know himself what he would do with the boy. He ought to give him to the police as he was a prisoner of war.

32. What did Hana inform Sadao about the servants? How did Sadao react to it?
Ans. The servants felt that they could not stay there if their master sheltered the white man there any more. They also accused them of liking Americans and of having forgotten to think of their own country first. Dr Sadao protested that it was not true. Americans were their enemies. But he had been trained not to let a man die if he could help him. Hana told him that the servants could not understand it.

Q33. ‘Somehow the household dragged on’. How did the servants behave after Sadao had operated upon the American? What opinions did they express?
Ans. The servants grew more watchful day by day. Their courtesy was as careful as ever, but their eyes were cold towards Hana and Sadao. The old gardener was sore, why Sadao had not let the young man bleed when he was so near the death. The cook remarked contemptuously that being proud of his skill to save life that he saves any life. Yumi added that they must think of the children. She enquired: “What will be their fate if their father is condemned as a traitor?”

Q34. What two things happened on the seventh day after that?
Ans. In the morning the servants left together with their belongings tied in large square cotton kerchiefs. Hana paid them off gracefully and thanked them for all that they had done for her. In the afternoon, a messenger came to the door in official uniform.

Q35. How did Hana react when she saw a messenger at the door in official uniform?
Ans. Hana was working hard on unaccustomed labour. When she saw the uniformed messenger, her hands went weak and she could not draw her breath. She feared that the servants must have told everything already. She thought that they had come to arrest Dr Sadao.

Q36. Why, do you think, had the messenger come to Dr Sadao’s house? How did Hana react to the message and what did the messenger take exception to?
Ans. The messenger had arrived there to ask Dr Sadao to come to the palace as the old General was in pain again. In her anxiety for her husband’s safety, Hana asked if that was all. The messenger took exception to the word ‘all’ and enquired if that was not enough. Hana  apologised for the error.

Q37. Why did Dr Sadao tell the General everything about the man he had operated upon?
Ans. Dr Sadao could not report the arrival of the escaped prisoner at his doorstep. He wanted to get rid of the man for the sake of his wife. He explained his position to the General. He did not care for that man, but since he had operated upon the man he could not kill him. The
General praised his skill, called him indispensable and promised that he would allow nothing to happen to Dr Sadao.

Q38. Why, do you think, did the old General not want Dr Sadao to be arrested?
Ans. Dr Sadao had told the General that he could stand only one more such attack as he had that day. Then he would have to be operated upon. The General wanted Dr Sadao to operate upon him. He had no faith in the other surgeons trained by the Germans. So, he would not let Dr Sadao be arrested.

Q39. What plan did the old General suggest for getting rid of the ‘man’?
Ans. He thought that it would be best if the white man could be quietly killed—not by the doctor, but by someone who did not know him. He offered to send two of his private assassins any night to his home. These capable assassins would make no noise. They knew the trick of inward bleeding. They could even remove the body. Dr Sadao had to leave the outer partition of the room open and this made restless.

Q40. Why did Sadao sleep badly at night after meeting the General?
Ans. Sadao woke up time and again thinking he heard the rustling of footsteps, the sound of a twig broken or a stone displaced in the garden—or any noise such as men might make who carried a burden. This went on for three nights. Every night Sadao expected the assassins to come and this made him restless.

Q41. What plan did Dr Sadao devise to get rid of the man?
Ans. Dr Sadao devised the plan of letting the man escape to the nearest uninhabited island. He told the man everything. He put his boat on the shore with food and extra clothing. He advised the man to row to the little island not far from the coast. He could live there till he saw a Korean fishing boat pass by.

Q42. How was the plan of the prisoner’s escape executed?
Ans. Dr Sadao had put food and bottled water in his stout boat. He also put two quilts. After supper, he cheked the American again. He gave him his flashlight and told him to signal two flashes if he needed more food. One signal would mean he was OK He had to signal at sunset and not in the darkness. The man was dressed in Japanese clothes and his blond head was covered with a black cloth.

Q43. What did Sadao tell the General after a week? Why did he wait that long?
Ans. The General had undergone an emergency operation a week before. The gall bladder was involved. He was in critical state for twelve hours. Then he recovered slowly. After a week Sadao felt that the General was well enough to be spoken to about the prisoner. He told the General that the prisoner had escaped.

Q44. What did the General tell Dr Sadao about his promise to kill the prisoner for him?
Ans. Dr Sadao did not want to disturb the General much. So he simply said that the prisoner had escaped. The General at once remembered his promise. He confessed that he had been suffering a great deal. He thought of nothing but himself. He forgot his promise, but it was not lack of patriotism or dereliction of duty.

Q45. “I wonder why I could not kill him?” What makes Dr Sadao think so?
Ans. After the departure of the young American, Dr Sadao thinks of the other white faces he had “come across. The Americans were full of prejudice and he had found it bitter to live there. The white people were repulsive even in their kindness. It was relief to be openly at war with them. Then he remembered the youthful, haggard face of the prisoner. It was also white and repulsive. He thought it strange that he spared his enemy. He wondered why he could not kill him.

LONG ANSWER TYPE QUESTIONS

Q1. Why did SadaoHoki go to America? What do you learn about his experiences there?
Ans. Sadao’s education was his father’s chief concern. So he had been sent at twenty-two to America to leam all that could be learnt of surgery and medicine. He studied there for eight years and returned to Japan at thirty. Before his father died, Sadao had become famous not only as a surgeon, but also as a scientist.
He had had great difficulty in finding a place to live in America because he was a Japanese. The Americans were full of prejudice and it had been bitter to live in it, knowing himself to be superior to them. An ignorant and dirty old woman at last consented to house him in her miserable home. He found her repulsive to him even in her kindness.
One of his American professors and his wife were kind people. They were anxious to do something for their few foreign students. But their rooms were quite small, the food was very bad, the professor was a dull person and his wife was a silly talkative woman.

Q2. How can you say that Dr Sadao’s father was a Japanese to the core?
Ans. Dr Sadao’s father had high dreams about the future of Japan. There was no limit to their future as it depended on what they made it. He never played or joked with his only son. But he spent infinite pains upon him. For the sake of the best possible medical education, he sent his son to America. Sadao met Hana there, but waited to fall in love with her until he was sure she was Japanese. His father would never have received her unless she had been pure in her race. Their marriage was arranged in the old Japanese way only after Sadao’s father had seen her when both of them had come home to Japan after finishing their education.
He was a Japanese every inch. The floor of his room was deeply matted. He would never sit on a chair or sleep in a foreign bed in his house. The quilt was covered with flowered silk and the lining was pure white silk. In short, everything here had been Japanese to please him.

Q3. What do you learn about Dr Sadao and Harm from the story ‘The Enemy’?

Ans. Sadao and Hana represent modem, enlightened and educated Japanese who get the benefit of American training in medical science, yet retain love and respect for their moth¬erland and its customs and traditions. He was an obedient and caring son who had deep regard for his father. He married Hana only after his father had seen her. Their marriage was arranged in the old Japanese way. They were perfectly happy and had two children. Even years after their marriage they retained the same love and affection for each other. Since Japan was at war with America, they considered the Americans as their enemies. The waves of the ocean had flung up a wounded young American to their doorstep. They wanted to put him back into the sea, but neither of them was able to do so. They brought the wounded man inside their house in spite of repulsion for him. Sadao had been trained not to let a man die if he could help him. The ethics of the medical profession forced him to save even his enemy. His wife Hana obeyed all his commands and instructions like a child though she suffered a lot internally.

Q4. What was the dilemma that Sadao faced when he saw a wounded, young white man washed to his doorstep? What solution did his wife, Hana, offer to resolve his (Sadao’s) predicament?
Ans. The young white man was bleeding. He had a bullet wound on his lower back. He needed immediate medical attention. Dr Sadao, an eminent surgeon, could do so. But if they sheltered a white man in their house, they would be arrested. On the other hand, if they tinned him over as a prisoner, he would certainly die. Neither of them could put him back into the sea and get rid of him. They were true humanist. So, they hesitated.
Sadao declared that being an American, the man was his enemy. He would have handed him over to the police if he had been hale and hearty. But since he was wounded… He left the sentence unfinished implying that he could not do so as he had been trained not to let a man die if he could help him.
Hana suggested that they must carry the man inside the house. They must tell the servants that they intended to hand him over to the police. She reminded her husband of his position and the children. It would endanger all of them if they did not hand that man over as a prisoner of war. His doubts were removed and they decided to carry the man into their house.

Q5. How did Dr Sadao take the man inside his house and try to save him?
Ans. Dr Sadao and Hana lifted the man together. He was very light. His arms were hanging
down. They carried him up the steps and into the side door of the house. This door opened •
into a passage. Down the passage, they carried him towards an empty bedroom. They laid the man on the deeply matted floor. The man was quite dirty, so Dr Sadao suggested that he should be washed.
The utter pallor of the man’s unconscious face moved Dr Sadao first to stoop and feel his pulse. It was faint, but it was there. Then he put his hand against the man’s cold breast.
The heart too was yet alive. He observed that the man would die unless he was operated upon immediately. He left the room to bring his instruments to perform an emergency operation to save the man’s life.

Q6. How did the servants initially react to the presence of a white man in their master’s house?
Ans.When Dr Sadao told the cook and the gardener about the wounded young white man, they
had brought inside the house, the two servants were frightened and puzzled. The *
superstitious old gardener looked so annoyed that he pulled the few hairs on his upper lip.
He bluntly told Hana that the master ought not to heal the wound of that white man. He said that the white man ought to die. First he was shot. Then the sea caught him and wounded him with her rocks. If the master healed what the gun and the sea had done, they would take revenge on them.
Even the maid, Yumi, refused to wash the man though Hana cried at her severely and told her to do what the master had commanded her to do. The servants seemed to be in a defiant mood. The fierce look of resistance upon Yumi’s dull face frightened Hana. She thought that the servants might report something that was not as it happened. She maintained her dignity and told the maid that they wanted to bring him to his senses so that they could turn him over as a prisoner. Even this explanation failed to convince Yumi and she refused to do anything for the white man.

Q7. What was the change in the mood of open defiance of their master on the part of domestic staff as time passed and the white man was kept in Dr Sadao’s house?
Ans. Dr Sadao not only kept the young white man at his home, but also operated upon him. It was the third day after the operation. The servants continued their open defiance of their master and did not enter the white man’s room. Hana served him herself. Hana told Sadao what the servants had conveyed through Yumi. The domestic staff felt that they could not stay there if their. master sheltered that man any more. They accused them of having forgotten to think of their own countiy because they had lived for a long time in America. They thought that their master and mistress liked Americans. Dr Sadao tried to clarify his position as a man and as a doctor. Hana told him that the servants could not understand this subtle distinction.
”Somehow the household dragged on. The servants grew more watchful day by day. They were careful in their courtesy as ever but their eyes were cold. The old gardener was the most vocal. He taunted that their master knew very well what he ought to do. He was sore why Sadao had not let the young man bleed when he was so near to death. The cook remarked contemptuously that the young master was so proud of his skill to save life that he saved any life. Yumi added that they must think of the children. She enquired: “What will be their fate if their father is condemned as a traitor?”
Since the white man was not handed over to the police, even after a week, all the servants left on the seventh day after that.

Q8. Hana was a loving, caring, devoted and obedient wife who was quite anxious about her husband’s wellbeing, position and reputation? Discuss.
Ans. Hana is the alter ego of her husband, Dr SadaoHoki. She has adapted herself to his ways. She knows that saving a life is a mission for him and when he is attending on his patient, he forgets everything else—even Hana herself. Even years after their marriage, they retain the same love and affection for each other.
She cared for him a lot and would not let him stand outside in the cold foggy February night. She was a bit sentimental, yet pragmatic in her approach. She was quick to judge what went on in her husband’s mind and suggested solutions. She maintained her dignity when the servants showed resistance and open defiance. As an obedient and devoted wife, she carried out all the orders and instructions of her husband. She washed the wounded white man, gave him anaesthesia and later on food.
She was worried about her husband’s safety, position and reputation. Initially, she suggested to throw the man back into the sea. She was afraid that the servants might misreport. Her fears are exhibited clearly when a messenger in uniform arrives from the palace. In order to calm down her fears, Dr Sadao decides to get rid of the white man anyhow. In short, she is an ideal life partner.

Q9. What impression do you form of Dr Sadao as a man and as a surgeon from your reading of the story ‘The Enemy’?
Ans. Dr SadaoHoki was a true Japanese like his father. He was a brave boy who obeyed and respected his father and loved Japanese culture, tradition and people. He was intelligent and hard working and studied surgery and medicine in America for eight years. He married a Japanese girl, Hana, whom he had met in America. But he waited for his father’s approval and their marriage was arranged in the old Japanese way after they had returned home to Japan. They had two children. He still loved his wife as warmly as ever. He returned home at fixed hours.
Dr Sadao was an eminent surgeon as well as scientist. The old General had full faith in him. He was not sent abroad with the troops because the old General might need an operation. Dr Sadao was called even at odd hours from the palace. Dr Sadao was a real doctor. He would not let a man die if he could help him. That is why he cured even an “enemy” of bullet wound and did not hand him over to the police. He faced a great risk to his position and life by sheltering the man. Since Dr Sadao could not kill the man himself, he sought the help of the old General to get rid of him. When that plan failed, he let the prisoner escape in order to calm down the fears of his wife and let the household run properly. It may be a blemish from a narrow patriotic angle but a sensitive soul can’t take back what he has given.

Q10. Under what circumstances did Dr Sadao let the wounded white man escape? Was it lack of national loyalty, professional ego and sentimentality, human consideration or just an attempt to save his skin?
Ans. DrSadao had no love for the repulsive Americans and he considered them his enemies. Unfortunately, the sea-waves pushed a wounded white man to his doorstep. He knew that the best possible thing was to throw him back into the sea. He could not handover a wounded ‘enemy’ to police because he would certainly die. Being a doctor, he could save him and not kill him. His efforts to get him removed with the help of the old General’s private assassins did not bear fruit.
He was under a severe strain. His domestic servants had left him. His wife had to do unaccustomed labour and run the household. Moreover, his wife was anxious about his safety. They might be arrested for harbouring an enemy prisoner of war and condemned as traitors.
Dr Sadao let the man escape in the larger interest of professional ethics and human consideration. He rose above narrow national loyalty and sentimentality. He did not think of himself as the General had already assured him that no harm would be caused to him. The matter remained unreported and closed from public eyes and ears. The servants returned after the white man had “left”. Everything became normal again.

Q11. Comment on the role of the old General in the story ‘The Enemy’.
Ans. The old General plays an important role in the story. He is being treated medically for a condition which might need an operation any time. Since he has full faith in Dr Sadao, he is kept back in Japan. Dr Sadao is indispensable to the General. He assures Sadao that nothing will happen to him and he will not be arrested.
The arrival of the messenger rouses Hana’s worst fears. She thinks that police has come to arrest her husband. Dr Sadao gets distressed at her anxiety and decides to get rid of the white man for her sake. When Dr Sadao confides in the General, the latter promises to send two of his private assassins to remove the man from the scene.
The old General has an unsual sense of humour as well as frankness and ability to admit his mistake. Dr Sadao keeps on waiting for three nights for the assassins who fail to turn up. He loses sleep and rest. Finally he lets the white man escape.
When Dr Sadao tells the General that the man has escaped, the General admits that he forgot his promise. He was suffering a great deal and thought of nothing but himself. It was careless of him but not lack of patriotism or dereliction of duty, It is his self-absorption and instinct of preserving himself that saves Dr Sadao and his family from being arrested.

Q12. The ending of the story ‘The Enemy’ epitomises the attitude of a Japanese towards Americans during the war. Elucidate.OR
Comment on the ending of the story ‘The Enemy’.
Ans. The ending of the story, ‘The Enemy’ is highly artistic. The old General, recovering from the operation, promises that Dr Sadao will be rewarded as he is a good man. Dr Sadao has his reward when he finds that his prisoner has gone away safely from the island. He now recalls all the other white faces he ever came across. The professor, at whose house he met Hana, was a dull man and his wife had been a silly, talkative woman, in spite of her wish to be kind. His old teacher of anatomy had been insistent on ‘mercy with the knife’. He remembered the face of his fat and slatterly landlady whom he had despised for being ignorant and dirty. He remembered the difficulties he faced in finding a place to live in America because he was a Japanese. The Americans were full of prejudice and, it had been bitter to live in America. He found the white people repulsive. It was a relief to be openly at war with them. Then he remembered the youthful, haggard face of the prisoner. It was also white and repulsive. He thought it strange that he spared his enemy. He is left wondering why he could not kill the white man “his enemy”.

Q13. Do you think the title ‘The Enemy’ is appropriate? Give reasons in support of your answer.
Ans. The title ‘The Enemy’ is quite appropriate and highly suggestive. It focuses our attention on the wounded man who is incidentally washed ashore to the doorstep of a famous Japanese surgeon, Dr SadaoHoki during the war.
The first reaction of the Japanese pair is typical of average, patriotic Japanese who hate their white enemies. However, the doctor in Sadao prompts him to bring the man inside his house and cure him. The doctor’s involvement with the white enemy annoys the domestic staff who show open defiance and resistance. The doctor faces grave danger to his position, safety, name, fame and family by harbouring the enemy. He could be condemned as a traitor and killed.
In spite of all the odds, the doctor finds himself emotionally unable to hand him over to the police. He has no love for the man. He regards him his enemy, yet he can’t kill him. He tells the old General how he operated on the white man and saved him. The General is all praise for his skill, hopes for his own successful operation at his hand, and promises to kill the man for him.
The doctor faces a lot of tension—mental, emotional and physical. He passes sleepless nights waiting for the assassins, who never turn up. Meanwhile, ‘the enemy’ recovers and the doctor devises means to let him escape in order to get rid of him. At the end of the story he is left wondering why he could not kill that man.

Q14. What was the General’s plan to get rid of the American prisoner? Was it executed? What traits of the General’s character are highlighted in the lesson ‘The Enemy’?
Ans. The General made a plan to get rid of the American prisoner by sending his personal assassins to kill the prisoner. He also wanted to remove the body of American prisoner from Sadao’s house. But, unfortunately he could not succeed in his attempt. The plan was i not executed. The General could not send the assassins.
The General had an unusual sense of humour as well as frankness and ability to admit his mistake. Dr.Sadao keeps on waiting for three nights for the assassins who fail to turn up. He loses his rest and sleep. Finally he lets the white man escape. When Dr.Sadao tells the General that the man has escaped, the General admits that he forgot his promise. It was carelessness of him but not the lack of patriotism. It is his self-absorption and instinct of preserving himself that saves Dr.Sadao and his family being arrested.

DISCLAIMER:Dear friends,RESOURCES below have been collected from various sources for the purpose of teaching and learning for students and teachers in the times of pandemic.We acknowledge all the resources. we thank all the resources.In this blog you will find related videos of the chapter,pdf of questions and ppt of lessons with MCQs selected from various resources to give you best learning.

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